What to expect when working with an interior designer

What to expect when working with an interior designer

I received feedback from a client this week, they expressed their thoughts about what they expected from working with me.  Their expectations were different from the nature of the service I was providing.  Different again from what they confirmed as the Scope of Works for the project. It made me think about what to expect when working with an interior designer?

It’s always hard to hear client feedback like that, especially as my primary aim is to realise my client’s vision and ensure they’re happy.  I had a good chat with my client, and we came up with a solution.  They are definitely happy with most things so far, so that’s good, and once we implement a solution for the area they’re concerned about they will be completely happy.  There’s always a solution to any problem.

Client expectations of interior designer

But this got me thinking about expectations.  A client comes to work with an interior designer with many expectations.  I don’t know where these expectations come from.  Maybe they come from a previous experience of working with an interior designer, maybe they come from watching the unreal experience of reality TV programs.

This level of expectation weighs heavily on the shoulders of an interior designer because it’s unknown.  No client of mine has said, ‘yes I’m happy to work with you and here is what I’m expecting.’  Most clients let me lead them through the design process. It’s those clients that end up having the best experience and the best outcomes.

Interior designer expectations of client

I also thought about a designer’s expectations of a client.  For example, I expect that the documentation I provide is read and understood, like, the Scope of Works.  The Scope of Work is an important tool for communicating deliverables.

It’s also expected that a client will provide considered feedback so that I can make suitable alternative suggestions.  It’s hard to manage a project when there are constant changes.  Especially when the changes exceed the number of revisions the client agreed to.

Communication, collaboration and trust are the key ingredients that ensures a successful interior designer and client relationship.  I feel very privileged to be allowed into my client’s home and their lives.  I take my work seriously, so I’m always open to feedback because it’s important at the end of the day that the client gets what they want and has a positive experience they enjoyed.

What do you expect from working with an interior designer? I would love to hear your thoughts?

Photo by LinkedIn Sales Solutions on Unsplash

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


You Might Also Like

What’s Japandi Style?

What’s Japandi Style?

During my internet travels recently, I came across a ‘new trend’ in the interior design world, that is Japandi.  This is interesting to me because in Australia, Japanese style elements are not overly popular.  So […]

Making a house a home

Making a house a home

This week I went shopping with a client.  Admittedly it’s not something I usually do. But since staring this project in March my client and I have become friends and our homewares shopping trip was […]

Working with multiple wood tones

Working with multiple wood tones

It’s a question that gets asked a lot from clients and in online forums – do I need to match my timber furniture?  The simple answer is no.  But first I want to clarify that […]