Mid-Century Modern Kitchen Tour

Mid-Century Modern Kitchen Tour

I recently completed a kitchen refurbishment in Brunswick.  The client engaged me to specify the selections for the kitchen.  As always, I started this project by defining a design strategy. This means confirming the clien’s interior style goal and a colour scheme.  The client was clear they wanted a Mid-Century Modern kitchen.

But I needed to understand why they wanted a Mid-Century Modern inspired kitchen?  What features of Mid-Century Modern interior style did they like and want to see in their kitchen.  Was it the use of timber, geometric shapes, a particular colour palette.

I also needed to bear in the mind the existing flooring which was not changing.  The floor had a pattern that was not in line with Mid-Century Modern and it was grey and white.  So grey and white had to be part of the colour palette for my client’s kitchen.

Key features of Mid-Century Modern

After completing the brief stage of this project I understood my client’s priorities were on the use of timber, a classic door profile, geometric shapes and an accent colour of sage.

They were using Ikea for the overall layout. So, from the Ikea range I chose two colours for the cabinetry, white and ash.  The ash selection ensured there was a timber, earthy element that my client’s wanted.  The ash itself had an interesting pattern which had depth to the space.

I chose a flat shaker style door profile due to its timelessness and added a sage geometric splashback.  Because, the splashback is a feature of any kitchen, it needed to clearly communicate the Mid-Century Modern interior style goal.

Finally, I specified the pendant lights. These are replicas from the Mid-Century Modern period and where the perfect finishing touch to achieving this popular style and to ensure that my client’s goals were met in this Mid-Century Modern kitchen refurbishment project.


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