Best placement for your bed

Best placement for your bed

I recently checked in with an ensuite bathroom specification client to see how the project is progressing. In talking about the ensuite we also discussed the adjacent master bedroom. Specifically, the placement of the bed. She had planned for the bed to go under a window, I had a gut reaction to this idea. So a conversation followed about the best placement for your bed.

Function of a bedroom

While we travel around the internet for inspo pics of bedrooms we shouldn’t forget the primary function of the bedroom. The primary function of the master bedroom, any bedroom, is sleep and relaxation.

So while, we endeavour to make our bedrooms aesthetically pleasing they also need to be conducive to a good night’s sleep. There are many health benefits to a good sleep so we need to get our bedrooms right in terms of layout and aesthetics.

While I realise that a bedroom might be a multifunctional space, for example, you might do yoga in your bedroom. You also might watch TV in your bedroom, the fact remains the primary function is about sleeping, resting and unwinding from a hard day’s work.

Best placement of your bed

With sleep and rest front of mind when working on a bedroom, there is one question that can be answered quickly. This question is the position of the bed. A bed should always be placed against a solid wall.

There are interior design reasons for this but also Feng Shui principles support placing your bed against a solid wall.

Placing your bed against or under a window has temperature and chi implications. Chi is essentially energy and with your bed against a window you’re inviting all the external chi energy into your subconscious mind while you sleep.

Of course you may not agree or believe this concept but I do and would never encourage placing a bed under a window, it’s not good interior design nor Feng Shui.

Electronics in your bedroom

Simply electronic equipment in your bedroom is a big no. No TV, no phones, no tablets, no devices, period. Including any exercise equipment or beauty tools such as a curling wand or hair dryer.

I know that for so many people that this is a) not preferable and b) not feasible. But the energy that devices omit impact the overall calmness a bedroom needs to fulfil its primary function of rest and relaxation.

While it’s hard to change a habit, bearing in mind the importance of sleep on health and stress, at least consider a small adjustment, for example no TV in the bedroom. Then try no mobile phone in the bedroom.

Some clients want arm chairs or day beds in their bedroom for lounging, some clients want their bedroom to be a parent retreat. But the bottom line is that the bed is the focal piece of this space and all other furniture and furnishings should complement the bed to achieve the primary function.

A busy or cluttered bedroom with a bad layout is an interior design fail, definitely less is more in a bedroom as well as placing the bed against a solid wall.


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